Indigenous Histories of the U.S. and Canada

Summer Quarter, 2018

Tuesdays, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Norris University Center

A.  Indigenous Histories of the U.S. and Canada

Doug Kiel, Assistant Professor, History

Tuesdays, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Norris University Center

This course will reframe the United States and Canada by highlighting the often-neglected histories of the Native Americans who have called the North American continent home for thousands of years.  This course will begin by examining Indigenous North America before the arrival of European empires and their competing visions for the North American continent. The course will then shift toward the law to offer a nuanced understanding of the legal mechanisms of U.S. and Canadian colonialism, before shifting to the U.S. occupation of Hawaii and Alaska. In the course’s final two lectures, we will discuss romanticized depictions of Native people through the medium of film, as well as the processes of Native American nation building following the devastating policies of the nineteenth century.  Throughout the course, we will emphasize colonialism as an ongoing phenomenon and acknowledge the important role of Indigenous people in shaping – and resisting- what we  now know as the United States and Canada.

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Course Documents